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Saturday, March 21, 2009

Windows Diskpart Command

Diskpart is a Recovery Console command used to create or delete partitions on hard drives.

Diskpart Command Syntax
diskpart /add
/add = The /add option will create a new partition on the specified hard drive.
diskpart /delete
/delete = This option will remove a specified partition on a specified hard drive.
Diskpart Command Examples:
diskpart /add \Device\HardDisk0 10000
In the above example, the diskpart command creates a 10,000 MB partition on the hard drive located at \Device\HardDisk0.
diskpart /delete \Device\HardDisk0\Partition1
In the above example, the diskpart command will remove the Partition1 partition located on the hard drive \Device\HardDisk0.
diskpart /delete E:
In the above example, the diskpart command will remove the partition currently assigned the drive letter E.

Note:
The diskpart command is only available from within the Recovery Console in Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

Diskpart Related Commands

Windows Fixmbr Command

Fixmbr is a Recovery Console command that writes a new master boot record to the hard disk drive that you specify.

Fixmbr Command Syntax
fixmbr (device_name)
device_name = This is where you designate the exact drive location that a master boot record will be written to. If no device is specified, the master boot record will be written to the primary boot drive.
Fixmbr Command Examples:
fixmbr \Device\HardDisk0
In the above example, the master boot record is written to the drive located at \Device\HardDisk0.
fixmbr
In this example, the master boot record is written to the device that your primary system is loaded onto. If you have a single installation of Windows installed, which is normally the case, running the fixmbr command in this way is usually the right way to go.

Note:
The fixmbr command is only available from within the Recovery Console in Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

Fixmbr Related Commands

Windows Fixboot Command

Fixboot is a Recovery Console command that writes a new partition boot sector to the system partition that you specify.

Fixboot Command Syntax
fixboot (drive)
drive = This is the drive that a boot sector will be written to and will replace the system partition that you're currently logged on to. If no drive is specified, the boot sector will be written to the system partition that you're currently logged on to.

Fixboot Command Examples
fixboot c:
In the above example, the boot sector is written to the partition that's currently labeled as the C: drive - most likely the partition you are currently logged on to. If that is the case, this command could be run without the c: option.

The fixboot command is only available from within the Recovery Console in Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

Fixboot Related Commands

Bootcfg Command in Windows 7, Vista, 2008

Bootcfg is a Recovery Console command used to build or modify the boot.ini file.

Bootcfg Command Syntax:
bootcfg /list
/list = This option will list every entry in the boot list in the boot.ini file.

bootcfg /scan
/scan = Using this option will instruct bootcfg to scan all drives for installations of Windows and then display the results.

bootcfg /rebuild
/rebuild = This option will step you through the process of rebuilding the boot.ini file.

bootcfg /default
/default = the /default switch sets the default boot entry in the boot.ini file.

bootcfg /add
/add = This option allows for the manual entry of a Windows installation in the boot.ini boot list.
Bootcfg Command Examples:
bootcfg /rebuild
In the above example, the bootcfg command scans all drives for any Windows installations, displays the results, and steps you through building the boot.ini file.

Note:
The bootcfg command is only available from within the Recovery Console in Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

Bootcfg Related Commands

Thursday, March 12, 2009

Monday, March 2, 2009

BT4 Install: Simplest way to install BackTrack4

Remote-exploit and BackTrack released the public Beta of BackTrack 4 the second week of February. As soon as this news came out, all sorts of people were on its download spree.  Within 5 days the download count reached 49,000+ for ISO and 17,000+ for the VMWare image.

As BT4 is still in its (pre release) Beta phase a lot of packages are missing, especially VoIP and Services sections. So you will need to manually start and control the services like sshd, vnc etc.  One more prominent change you should note is DHCP configurations and dhcp client (dhcpcd) are deliberately removed from startup script. BackTrack 4 starts in runlevel 2 where networking is disabled.

For BackTrack 4 the team introduced a new shell called “Debian Almquist Shell (Dash)” and /bin/sh is now a symlink to /bin/dash. It looks like “dash” shell does not support most of the semantics of legacy bash shell. As per wikipedia – Dash is a direct descendant of the NetBSD version of the Almquist Shell (ash).

Installing BackTrack needs at least 4 GB of free space on Hard drive. BT4 Beta has foot print of 856 MB without having voip packages. It could easily reach 1 GB mark in the future. So Make sure you have enough hard disk space before starting installation.

Go to the PowerCram HowTo: Backtrack 4 (Pre Release) Hard Drive Installation or BackTrack 4 Beta Hard Disk Install.

BackTrack links